Abbeyfield House Frankston

Abbeyfield Australia is a national not-for-profit community housing provider that represents 26 independent Abbeyfield Societies in towns and suburbs across Australia. Abbeyfield House Frankston opened in 1991, offering disadvantaged elderly people a safe place to live. Residents who have a limited income can feel safe in a familiar environment with access to companionship and support. The house, a purpose built two-storey residence on land provided by local government, operates on the sole income from the residents who are in receipt of a full government pension.

The success of the Abbeyfield Frankston relies on the good will, expertise and effort of a locally based volunteer Committee of Management. Input from these volunteers has ensured the concept is cost effective and sensitive to day-to-day management. Emphasis is also placed on forming partnerships with other volunteers and resources to help with the work, and a long-standing relationship has been developed with Frankston North Rotary.

Abbeyfield rooms

Before

In recent years, it became evident that the house was in need of some major maintenance that would absorb a substantial amount of its financial resources to pay for the labour and cost of materials. This is where Frankston North Rotary was able to help. Members have performed a number of voluntary labour activities that have greatly helped Abbeyfield. In 2017 the club was successful in a District grant application that provided substantial funds to undertake major maintenance to the internal and external fabric of the property.

Abbeyfiled

After

With these funds, and the hands-on labour contribution from Rotarians, two residents’ rooms and bathrooms have been refurbished, balcony floors replaced, and the balcony at the top of the stairwell replaced. Next is the upgrade to the residents garden area.

Monterey Secondary College Mini Farm Project

In early 2018 Frankston North Rotary, together with Monterey Secondary College and their Interact Club Monteract, created a Mini Farm Project. The aim of the project is to have students involved in the management of the mini farm so that they gain new skills. This will mean taking care of the chooks and any other animals, growing vegetables, and generally developing the farm. There are plans for some sheep or goats, and as well the local apiarist club wants to install several beehives.

The project is being undertake in the school grounds within a fenced off area where there was a previous mini farm. The area includes a shed for housing equipment, four raised vegetable gardens (originally installed by Frankston North Rotary) and a small orchard.
The project is mainly funded by Monterey Secondary College, with Frankston North Rotary, assisted by some students, supplying the labour at regular working bees.

TreesWork has involved clearing out the current shed; trimming and removing trees and branches as required; re-developing the vegetable garden beds and fencing around the vegetable garden; installing a chicken shed and run, including the delivery of water pipe to the shed; and pruning the fruit trees. Monteract students and VCAL students have been involved where possible. The aim is to have the chook shed functional and some vegetables growing by end of this year

Frankston Community Raffle 2018

One of Frankston North Rotary’s signature projects is the annual Community Raffle. The raffle has been running over the past 27 years and has returned more than $1.7 million to local community groups, schools and clubs. Local clubs, schools or community groups sell tickets for $2.00 each, and to date a dividend of $1.50 per ticket sold was been paid back to these groups. How easy is that! Frankston North Rotary organises the prizes, permits, prints the tickets and oversee the running of the raffle. This year 33,000 tickets were sold.

Your local club, school or community group can raise funds simply by participating in the raffle. All you need to do is to sell as many tickets as you choose, and you receive the major part of the proceeds from your tickets for fund raising. Ticket sales usually start in February and finish in May. Prizes are drawn in the first week of June.

First prize this year was a dream holiday valued at $12,000, won by Sarah Mataoga; second prize was a South Pacific Carnival Cruise valued at $5000, won by Julie Johnson; third prize was a Hisense 65″ UHD Smart TV valued at $2000, won by Pino Iulianetti; and forth prize was a security door valued at $1000, won by Margaret Baird. Congratulations to the lucky winners.

Website: www.rotaryfrankstonnorth.org

Email: communityraffle@yahoo.com.au

Or visit Frankston North Rotary on Facebook.

International Women’s Day Breakfast 2018

On Wednesday 7 March 2018, another enlightening International Women’s Day Breakfast was held at the spectacular Mornington Racecourse with over 300 attending. Once again the weather was perfect, the breakfast delicious and the speakers inspirational. The project is a collaborative effort by Frankston North Rotary and the Frankston, Peninsula 2.0 and Mount Eliza Rotary clubs. The MC was Georgia Symmons.
One clear message delivered by both speakers was the importance of encouraging women to reach their full economic potential, now and in generations to come.
Kristen Hilton speaker at the 2018 IWD breakfastThe first speaker, Kristen Hilton, grew up as one of five girls in country Victoria before moving to Melbourne to complete a Law/Arts degree at Melbourne University. She worked in corporate law as an industrial relations lawyer before pursuing a career in social justice and human rights. Kristen is a Churchill Fellow and in 2007 spent time in Geneva, South Africa and the USA investigating the right to adequate housing.
In 2016 Kristen was appointed as Victoria’s Equal Opportunity and Human Rights Commissioner. Her role is to promote and protect human rights and equality across the state and lead the Commission’s work in creating a rights respecting culture within organisations, governments and communities. Kristen is the Chair of the expert panel in both the Fire Services review and Victoria Police review.
Sally Hine, speaker at the 2018 IWD breakfastThe second speaker, Sally Hines, is the Chief Operating Officer of The Big Issue and Homes for Homes. The Big Issue is an independent, not-for-profit organisation dedicated to supporting and creating work opportunities for homeless, marginalised and disadvantaged people. It well-known for The Big Issue magazine: a fortnightly, independent publication sold on the streets by vendors, who buy copies for $3.50 and sell them for $7, keeping the difference. Homes for Homes is a new initiative of The Big Issue that will help raise an ongoing supply of new funding for social and affordable houses.
Sally started her career in employment services, community development, youth mental health and health. She has held various strategic, service delivery and operational management positions, including experience in establishing new not-for-profit businesses across Australia in diverse communities.

2018 Elisabeth Murdoch Deb Ball

On Thursday 22 March and Friday 23 March 2018, students from Elisabeth Murdoch College attended their Debutante Ball at the New Peninsula Centre, Mount Martha. And what a wonderful success both nights were! The venue was great, the dancing superb, due to the expertise of dance teachers Terry and Michelle from Marshere in Cranbourne, and all this was made possible due to the efforts of the Frankston North Rotary Club, who managed the planning and organisation of this successful event, along with facing many challenges.
There were around 700 attended over the two nights, and 52 debutante couples were presented. It was an amazing event and provided many great memories! Proud mums and dads watched as their wonderfully dressed sons and daughters completed their fantastic dance routine on each night.
This group starred on the Friday night.

Donations in Kind

Donations in Kind is a major recycling operation run by volunteers who coordinate, assess and package materials to be sent free throughout the world to people in need. Thousands of voluntary hours are spent each year to run this operation. It is Rotary Australia’s largest ongoing project and the West Footscray Store is the largest in Victoria. Equipment that no longer meets Australian standards for a number of reasons is collected by Rotary and then shipped in containers overseas to where it is needed most.

DIK truckFor a number of years, Frankston North Rotary has been working in partnership with Peninsula Health to identify hospital equipment that is recyclable and in good working condition, to provide short-term storage and to coordinate the transport to the Donations in Kind store in Footscray. The equipment is then load into shipping containers and sent to the countries of need, such as Africa, Kenya, Nepal, Indonesia, Timor, Philippines and Sri Lanka, where it is received by a Rotary Club or other creditable agency for distribution.

Donations in Kind is really about the fact that in western countries we have a lot of equipment that becomes redundant, but such equipment doesn’t even exist in other countries because of their impoverished state. Frankston North Rotary will continue to support the Donations in Kind program, along with other cluster clubs. The club also sponsored racking in the store at a cost of $450.

Computers for Communities Program: Schools

Frankston North Rotary has been running a Computer for Communities Program over the past 3 years. Data centres, which update their computer hardware every 3 years, donate their replaced equipment to the club. These computers are then allocated within the local Frankston North communities according to need. This means that local schools can have greater access to computers, enhancing programs that would otherwise be delayed or could not go ahead. It also gives Frankston North Rotary the opportunity to promote literacy and numeracy: key activities in giving back to the community.

The club has worked with St John’s Primary School to supply around 40 personal computers that were allocated to various educational programs. These included use in the library as a research tool for projects across all grades, and in the junior school where introductory activities on using computers are offered from prep to Year 1.

Monterey Secondary College Senior Study Hall

Monterey Secondary College Senior Study Hall

The club has also worked with Monterey Secondary College on the new Senior Student Study Hall. The club provided 10 personal computers, giving students the opportunity to research assignments individually and collectively. The hall has desks and leisure furniture plus online internet access to help students with their various VCE assignments. The senior students are responsible for the new study hall environment, and the facility serves to encourage them to take responsibility for their learning outcomes.

Adopt a Park: Ballam Park

Frankston North Rotary has had a long association with Ballam Park, Frankston. In 1981, the club put aside money to build a rotunda (picnic shelter) in the park. Ballam Park provides a great day out for people of all ages, with two regional playground areas, barbecues in the large picnic areas, a walking track, public toilets, a tennis wall and a basketball ring.

The Ballam Park Rotunda bears the Frankston North Rotary sign to acknowledge the erection of the shelter many years ago. The club takes pride in helping to keep it look clean and fresh. Ongoing maintenance has included Frankston North Rotary’s work on the restoration and painting of the rotunda.

The club, in conjunction with the Frankston City Council and the Department of Justice, has undertaken a program of Adopt a Park.  Frankston North Rotary holds regular community events at Ballam Park to remove graffiti on the art wall near the barbeque shelter and to maintain the bollards. Club members often their hands dirty as they undertake some physical work in the park.

International Women’s Day Breakfast 2017

On Wednesday 8 March 2017, an enlightening International Women’s Day Breakfast was held at the spectacular Mornington Racecourse with over 400 attending. The weather was perfect, the breakfast delicious and the speakers inspirational. The project is a collaborative effort by Frankston North Rotary and the Frankston, Peninsula 2.0 and Mount Eliza Rotary clubs. The money raised will be allocated to local community projects.
The first speaker, Kate Carnell AO, started with a quote from John Lennon: Life is what happens while you are busy making other plans. This is how she explained her life, from her early years as a pharmacist to her current role as Australian Small Business and Family Enterprise Ombudsman. Early in life she realised that to succeed in business you need to make people feel important: to listen to and be interested in both staff and customers.

Kate Carnel

Kate Carnell

After a successful 15-year career in pharmacy, including being the first female National Vice-President of the Pharmacy Guild of Australia, she went on to serve as Chief Minister of the Australian Capital Territory from 1995 to 2000, and has since held various CEO roles. To succeed in your life and career, Kate’s advice is to be ethically true to yourself, engage with the community and be willing to take risks.

The second speaker, Susan Berg, author of The Girl Who Lived, recounted the trauma when, as a 15 year old, she was the sole survivor of a boating accident that claimed the lives of her mother, father and brother. Suffering from survivor guilt, Susan charged down a path of self-destruction. In the following years she continued to face significant challenges and hardship, including domestic violence.

Susan Berg

Susan Berg

Then, at age 30, when she escaped death again in a fatal motorbike accident, Susan turned her life around, refusing to remain a victim of her past. She fought through her demons – learning to love herself and life again. In January 2017, she faced her greatest fear, open water, and swam the Lorne Pier to Pub. Then, on 26 February 2017, she completed the Rip Swim across Port Phillip. This was all part of her ongoing journey of self-healing, and to encourage other women to confront and overcome their fears.

Elisabeth Murdoch College Debutant Ball 2017

On Tuesday 28 March and Wednesday 29 March 2017, students from Elisabeth Murdoch College attended their Debutante Ball at the New Peninsula Centre, Mount Martha. And what a wonderful success both nights were! The venue and food were great, the dancing superb, due to the expertise of dance teachers Terry and Michelle from Marshere in Cranbourne, and all this was made possible due to the efforts of the Frankston North Rotary Club, who managed the planning and organisation of this successful event, along with facing many challenges.
There were around 700 attended over the two nights, and 53 debutante couples were presented. It was an amazing event and provided many great memories! Proud mums and dads watched as their wonderfully dressed sons and daughters completed their fantastic dance routine on each night.
This group of Elisabeth Murdoch College students were waiting for their limo to arrive and take them to the Tuesday Night Ball.